Department of Political Science and International Affairs

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the Department of Political Science and International Affairs are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

International Studies (EURO)

  • EURO 3234 - Introduction to the European Union

    • The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the European Union (EU). The course traces the development of the EU from its origins in the 1950s to the present day. Student will explore the EU's governing institutions, including their structure and relationship to one another. Students will be introduced EU policy-making processes. Students will use this knowledge of structures and processes to explore current EU policies and issues, including EU-USA relations.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4130 - EU Law & Legal Systems

    • This course focuses on a study of EU legal institutions and processes in the context of international law and in comparison to those of the United States. Topics include the treaties that provide the legal basis of the EU; the body of statutory law enacted by the Parliament, the Council, and the Commission; the judicial decisions adjudicated by the Court of Justice; and finally, the administrative rulings issued by the European Ombudsman.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4160 - Federalism & Multilevel Governance

    • The course exposes students to the political development of political structures in the European Union. The course will address in depth elements and principles of federal political systems. It explores the progressive development of federal type structures in European Union political structures. To emphasize the salience of such developments, the course compares EU-style federalism with federal structures and processes found in the United States.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4230 - Doing Business in the EU

    • This course focuses on political institutions and legal environment that impacts the conduct of business in the European Union. It examines the business environment for domestic and international firms and on how political decisions affect the business environment. It will show how some of the differences are born of economic factors relating to the functioning of the single market, while others are associated with the cultural heterogeneity.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4260 - European Monetary Union

    • This course examines the origins and development of European Monetary Union (EMU). It examines the economic and political reasons for EMU, the key decisions and steps in its creation, and its governing structures. We explore eurozone crises, including major events and developments, key causes and explanations, and the responses of European Union (EU) member states and institutions. The course concludes by exploring the consequences and implications of EMU for the EU and for Transatlantic relations.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4330 - EU Science & Technology Policy

    • This class is an examination of EU science and technology policy compared to that of the United States. The course examines how governments can encourage scientific and technological innovation and whether government can (or should) try to limit or control technological innovation. Historical contexts as well as current trends will be examined, with specific emphasis on policy outcomes.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4430 - EU Environmental Policy

    • This course examines the politics and policy-making processes associate with environmental policy in the European Union. Students will explore the historical development of EU environmental policy (EEP), identify the principle actors involved, and inquiry into the modes of governance applied. The course uses concrete empirical cases to illustrate core concepts and to provide a historical and developmental perspective. Principal emphasis is given to analyzing and understanding politics and political processes and in evaluating policy effects.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4530 - EU Social Policy

    • This course examines the politics and policy-processes associated with social policy in the European Union. Students will trace the historical development of the EU's role in social policy, identify the principle actors involved, and explore the variety of social welfare models found among EU states. The course uses concrete empirical cases to illustrate core concepts. Principal emphasis is given to analyzing and understanding politics and political processes and in evaluating policy effects.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4630 - EU Communications Policy

    • This course examines politics and policy-making as it pertains to broadcasting, voice telephony & the internet in the European Union. The course begins by examining the history of EU communications policy. It then explores policy developments and how successive enlargements have impact policies and practices. The course concludes by examining the future of EU policy in this issue domain.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4730 - EU Foreign Policy

    • The course explores the challenges facing the European Union as it attempts to pursue a more integrated and coherent common foreign policy. Students will examine the evolution of the EU's role in foreign policy. To do this, students will identify relevant EU governance institutions and explore the manner in which these institutions interact with key foreign policy institutions in member states. Students will explore these relationships with specific reference to economic, security and environmental policy.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4760 - EU-US Foreign Relations

    • The course examines the relationship between the European Union and the United States. Students explore the breadth and depth of the transatlantic cooperation across an array of issue domains. Students also explore areas where the parties disagree, sometimes significantly. Where differences exist, students examine the sources of transatlantic tensions, what has been done to address them, and consider whether disagreements can be resolved. Issues addressed include trade, regional and global security, terrorism, and the environment.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • EURO 4830 - EU in Comparative Perspective

    • This course examines the European Union in comparative perspective. Students will explore how problems of regional governance are addressed in the EU as well as in other regions. Students will look both at institutional structures and policy processes. Students will make specific comparisons to the African Union, MERCOSUR, NAFTA, and ASEAN. Further, students will explore whether meaningful differences exist between regional organizations found in the developed world and those found in the Global South.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3

International Policy Management (IPM)

  • IPM 7720 - World Politics and Governance

    • This course provides an advanced survey of the study of international relations. This course explores the influence that states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and other non-state actors have in shaping contemporary international political issues. The topics examined in this course include war and peace, global trade, economic development, international terrorism, human rights, poverty, disease, and the environment. Particular attention will be devoted to the emerging field of governance: the study of government performance in the areas of democracy, integrity, and sound economic policies.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7725 - Comparative Politics

    • This course examines the theory and method of comparative politics though the study of Western and non-Western political institutions and societies. The course provides students with an appreciation of the ways comparative political analysis enhances understanding of many contemporary issues throughout the world. It provides students with a familiarity of the comparative method of inquiry and basic skills in conducting comparative research, analysis.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7730 - International Conflict Management

    • This course examines the theory and practice of international conflict management which form an essential part of the methodology needed for international policy managers. The course will explore the causes of conflict, conflict management, conflict resolutions, and conflict transformation. Students will reflect upon various real-world examples facing policymakers and practitioners, and apply the tools and methods of conflict management to case studies and simulations.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7735 - Development: Policy and Practice

    • With its focuses on policy applications related to developing countries, this course examines alternative theories and definitions of development as expressed in the major international institutions (governmental and non-governmental) concerned with the transfer of resources, with emphasis on the interaction of political and economic factors. It examines how institutions, politics and governance promote economic development from a comparative perspective. Students will also explore concepts of gender and their practical application to international development programs and policies; culture's impact on human interaction; strategies that address basic human needs, promote human rights, and strengthen civil society; and the trade-offs among social, political and environmental aspects of sustainable development.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7740 - Strategic Negotiation and Decision-Making

    • This course will encompass both theoretical and practical aspects of negotiations. Students will explore some of the major approaches scholars and practitioners apply to the subject. Central to this will be an exploration of contending frameworks for analyzing bargaining and negotiation. Students will consider the unique aspects of negotiations as found across a variety of environments, both public (e.g., diplomacy) and private (e.g., business negotiation). Particular attention will be placed on cross-cultural communication and the negotiation challenges to which this gives rise. A major objective of this course is to develop the skills necessary to make individuals efficient and effective negotiators.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7745 - International Political Economy

    • This course examines the political influences which shape the global economic system. Particular attention will be devoted to the international organizations and global trade accords which shape the behavior of states and multinational corporations. In addition to exploring the mechanics and politics of the global economy, this course also examines the social impacts of the global exchange of goods and financial assets. The concept of globalization will represent an organizing theme for this course, and contentious debates surrounding this phenomenon will be explored.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7750 - Global Trade: Policy and Practice

    • This course introduces students to the politics of global trade. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary to think broadly and critically about the conduct of cross-border trade. After examining some of the major analytical frameworks that inform our understanding of global trade relations, students will focus on several substantive trade-related topics. Topics to be examined include: the role of the World Trade Organization, the rise of regional trade, and the reciprocal and interactive relationship between international trade, exchange rates and global finance. A major objective of this course is to develop application-oriented policy-relevant skills which students can employ across a range of professional environments.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7755 - Political Risk Management

    • Political risk analysis has been used to identify key political trends and developments in emerging and transitional economies, and to assess their impacts on flow of trade or capital. This course will investigate sources of political risk to foreign direct and other investments in a world characterized by increasing economic and financial interdependence, consider ways political risk can be analyzed, evaluated, and managed, and provide students hands-on experiences in assessing political stability and managing risk. Students will gain a basic understanding of different concepts associated with political risk analysis and the various approaches used by multi-nationals to the determination of political risk.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7756 - Comparative Regulatory Politics

    • This course examines the development of domestic and international regulatory climates and ensuing regulations made by governments and international institutions such as the European Union. Regulation covers a broad range of topics including labor, trade, production, health and safety, and environmental issues and has a significant impact on private sector interface with foreign governments and institutions. This course will also examine the impact of bilateral and multilateral treaties, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), on the regulatory arena.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7757 - Transnational Civil Society

    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7760 - Global Experience

    • This course incorporates material acquired in first-year courses and applies it to a real-world context through fieldwork, a study trip, or other equivalent means. Students are expected to link theory with practice through a series of public and private sector site visits. Students will explore how scholars and practitioners address the dilemmas of managing policy within an ever-changing global environment. The Global Experience course is mandatory for all students. If a student cannot participate in a planned trip due to extenuating circumstances, that student may petition for approval to substitute a Professional Experience Project in its place.
    • Prerequisites: Completion of first-year fall and spring semesters.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • IPM 7765 - Capstone: Practicum or Thesis

    • All students will select a capstone path that includes either (1) a practical work experience and final written report; or (2) a traditional Master’s thesis. The work experience can take the form of an internship or experience in an appropriate work setting. During this final semester students should be able to demonstrate the ability to understand and articulate the policy management context of a problem. The Capstone course provides the opportunity for students to clarify and refine the global policy issues presented during their professional experience or thesis hypothesis generation stage. Students will develop a project work plan; identify appropriate methodologies for collecting and organizing relevant information, and make policy recommendations for successful management of the issues. Students in this course will communicate results effectively in writing and by oral presentation and are encouraged to use the Global Experience (IPM 7760) as a gateway into the practicum or thesis topic.
    • Prerequisites: Second-year status in the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 6-0-6
  • IPM 7900 - Special Topics in International Policy Management

    • This course provides students an opportunity to explore topics not specifically addressed in a regular course offering, and that are of interest to practitioners and students.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSIPM program.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours

Conflict Management (MSCM)

  • MSCM 7100 - Introduction to Conflict Management

    • This course presents an overview of the emerging movement toward alternative forms of conflict resolution and of conflict management as an interdisciplinary field. Readings are drawn from a broad range of academic disciplines, including law, economics, social psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, as well as dispute resolution. Students are introduced to conflict resolution theories, dispute resolution processes, conflict management system design, and application of conflict management to the public policy environment.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7205 - Basic Mediation Training Clinic

    • This course is designed to provide students with basic mediation training approved by the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution for mediators handling court-referred or court-ordered cases.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7210 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: Conflict Theory

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the foundations and theories of conflict management. The course includes an interdisciplinary introduction to conflict management. The course includes an interdisciplinary introduction to conflict, the history of the field, sources of conflict, and conflict theory. The course introduces students to the various responses to conflict.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7220 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: Negotiation Theory

    • Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of negotiation theory through a format that includes lecture, role-play, focused exercises, and case study. Concepts covered will include an introduction to game theory, distributive and integrative bargaining, principled negotiation, psychological barriers to settlement, and negotiation ethics.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSCM program or permission of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7230 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: ADR Continuum

    • This course helps students develop an understanding of the nomenclature of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes commonly used in the United States. The students will examine the history and evolution of ADR, as well as briefly examining a number of individual processes in detail, such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, early neutral evaluation, ombuds offices, etc.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7310 - Critical Knowledge and Skills of Conflict Management: Interpersonal, Intergroup, and Community Conflict and Workplace/Organizational Conflict

    • This course examines the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict, including emphases on the role of identity in conflict and the experience of conflict in employment contexts. Students witll learn the common sources, processes, and effects of conflict through readings, presentations, and exercises.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSCM program and approval of the director in consultation with faculty, MSCM 7210, MsCM 7220, MSCM 7230.
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • MSCM 7315 - Organizational and Workplace Conflict

    • This course examines the dynamics of organizational conflict with a special focus on the workplace context. Students will sharpen the skills and tools they learned in previous MSCM coursework and apply them to problems of intervention in organizational disputes.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7320 - Critical Knowledge and Skills of Conflict Management: Public Policy Disputes, Cross-Cultural and International Conflict Resolution

    • This course examines public policy disputes and intercultural communication. Public policy disputes are unique in that they tend to be multi-party, multi-issue, long-standing, intractable, and they occur under the glare of public scrutiny. Therefore, managing public disputes requires greater ability to facilitate large-group processes and deal with the media. Next, the students will examine intercultural and international conflict resolution. The students will begin by developing an understanding of the ways in which cultures vary in their communication styles. Then students will examine the processes of international conflict resolution through diplomatic negotiation and mediation. Theories analyzing the strategic, structural, and behavioral features of international negotiations and mediations are discussed in lectures and case studies. Simulation exercises will be integrated to this class to provide students with hands-on experiences in applying theories to cases.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty, MSCM 7210, MSCM 7220, MSCM 7230, MSCM 7310.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7325 - Advanced Civil Mediation Clinic

    • Students will enhance their mediation skills and deepen their knowledge through observing mediation role-plays and videos. This course substitutes for 5 mediation observations, a requirement for registration with the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution (GODR).
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7205
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7335 - Organizational Leadership

    • The class will focus on the key skills needed for superior organizational leadership. Class will review the literature on leadership and conflict management, dynamic organizational leaders, and analysis of scenarios.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7355 - Advanced International Mediation Clinic

    • This clinic will examine the applicability of mediation to a range of international disputes, with emphases on the coordination and timing of mediation efforts, and the complexity of the international arena. Students will review standards of practice from international organizations related to diplomacy and commerce, and apply these to selected cases.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7365 - Humanitarian Crisis Intervention

    • This is a two-day training course designed to explore a range of dilemmas and scenarios in humanitarian, peacebuilding, conflict and human rights crises. The course is built around using simulations.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7400 - Conflict Management Research Methods

    • This course is designed to introduce students to basic research methods used in the study of conflict. There is a particular emphasis upon methods to assess conflict and evaluation interventions designed to address conflict in a given environment.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7500 - Conflict Management Systems Design

    • This course will prepare students to design a system to address conflict in the environment of an organization.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300; MSCM 7400
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7600 - Study of a Specific Conflict Management Environment

    • In this course the student chooses a specific environment for application of the knowledge and skills acquired through the academic and clinical components of the program. The study of a specific conflict environment provides the context for the student's fieldwork in the final semester of the MSCM program.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300; MSCM 7400; MSCM 7500
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7705 - Advanced Applied Skills Training

    • This 42-hour advanced skills training course will enhance student’s theoretical, research, and practice skills. The course will be focused on the implementation of certain forms of practice, realms of practice, and the skills sets needed by the practitioner in each specific conflict management environment. Emphasis will be on the honing of skills for the student’s particular area of interest.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7205
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7710 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Experience

    • This course includes a fieldwork, study, and travel to a specific domestic conflict environment chosen by the student with the guidance of the faculty. The students will research the background and history of the conflict and prepare a written report of this fieldwork upon returning. This course usually involves several students and faculty working and traveling together.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7715 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Experience

    • This course includes a fieldwork, study, and travel to a specific international conflict environment. The students will research the background and history of the conflict and prepare a written report of this fieldwork upon returning. This course usually involves several students and faculty working and traveling together.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7720 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Study and Internship Reports

    • This course includes a field study in a specific conflict environment chosen by the student with the guidance of the faculty. The students will analyze conflict in the chosen environment and, where appropriate, will make policy recommendations or design and plan implementation of the intervention processes to address the conflict. The students will prepare an extensive written report of this analysis, accompanied by an annotated bibliography.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 5-0-5
  • MSCM 8900 - Special Topics

    • Exploration of a specified topic in conflict management.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study or permission of director of MSCM.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • MSCM 8940 - Directed Study

    • Admission to this course requires permission of the Program Director and faculty member. A directed study is a special, one-time offering of a topic for a specific student. The directed study does not substantially overlap with an existing course in the curriculum. Directed study proposals are a concentrated investigation of a selected topic, is a well-defined proposal, is of an advanced nature, and have detailed learning objectives and deliverables. The specific content will be determined jointly by the instructor and student.
    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours

Public Administration (PAD)

  • PAD 6200 - Fundamentals of Public Administration and Public Service

    • Covers the public policymaking process, civil service and administrative agencies, and policy implementation, with brief introductory foray into motivation, leadership, decision making, finance and budgeting, and personnel. Contrasts between public and business administration will be included.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6250 - Research Methods and Computer Applications

    • Develops familiarity with methods of research and analysis useful to public service practitioners. Survey and research design, statistical methods such as descriptive and inferential statistics, including multiple regression, will be covered. Involves intense hands-on computer work using statistical software.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6300 - Public Organization Theory

    • Offers conceptual and practical perspectives for understanding and managing organizations. A spectrum of theories of organization will be examined. The concepts and issues to be discussed include mechanical and organismic aspects of organizations, organizational culture and politics, organizational psychodynamics, and recent theories of organizing. The implications of the theories for a reflective practice will be the focus of class discussions.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6350 - Public Service Budgeting

    • Techniques of financial management, chiefly in local agencies, covering the origins and types of modern budgeting, from line-item, program and performance, to zero-based budgeting. Attention will be paid to both the politics of the budgetary process and the financial and accounting principles involved, with a strong emphasis on hands-on exercises.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6450 - Governmental Relations

    • Examines the interaction between the federal, state, and local levels of government in the United States and their interaction with nonprofit and other private sector organizations. Special attention is given to the constitutional and fiscal relationships between these levels of government.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6500 - Policy Analysis

    • Deals with the theoretical issues and practical techniques of policy analysis. Focus will be on problem definition, alternative and criteria formulation, and decision making phases of prospective policy analysis. Students will learn to conduct simple analyses for policy decisions. Policy-analytic report writing and other forms of policy communication will also be emphasized.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6600 - Program Evaluation

    • This course is designed to introduce the basic methods of policy and program evaluation. These evaluation methods are used in needs assessments, monitoring social programs, and assessing the effectiveness and efficiency of their impacts. Quantitative approaches, such as experimental, quasi-experimental, and reflexive designs and the social, political, and ethical context of evaluation studies will be discussed.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 6700 - Human Resource Management in Public Service

    • This course addresses theories and principles of managing people in public and nonprofit organizations. Issues that will be addressed are the application of human resources concepts and processes, the legal and political influences impacting human resource management, and the distinctive role of human resource management in public and nonprofit organizations.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate college.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7100 - Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector

    • Provides students with a comprehensive overview of the historical development of community service and nonprofit organizations. Particular emphasis will be given to distinguishing the nature of nonprofit organizations from business and traditional government organizations. Also, the course will emphasize the unique philosophy of nonprofits, especially the notions of charity, philanthropy, community caring, and volunteerism.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7120 - Health Policy

    • Provides an overview of current health policy in the U.S. and government's role in it and how these have evolved in historical perspective. The organization, financing, and delivery of health care will be examined as well as issues such as access and the roles of various health care providers.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7130 - Regional Politics and Policy

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts in politics of local and regional governance. The history of the city and county administration in the U.S., power relations in urban areas, and the legal/structural bases of urban policymaking will be discussed in the class. The history and structure of American cities will be compared with those of European cities and the global implications of urban problems will be discussed.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7140 - International Environmental Policy

    • This course examines and evaluates the core parameters of international environmental policy, the elements of international environmental governance, and the associated institutions and instruments. The course explores global environmental change, examining the causes and impacts of global environmental problems. Current international environmental policies are examined through an examination of (i) the main actors of international environmental policy-making; (ii) the main instruments of international environmental policies; and (iii) the core principles of international environmental policy-making.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Public Administration Program
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7150 - Contemporary Public Issues

    • Covers a spectrum of issues which may range from local matters such as education, housing, and urban planning to broader concerns such as health care and economic policy as well as environmental conditions. For each issue cross-national comparisons will be explored and alternative policy solutions will be developed and discussed.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7180 - Nonprofit Governance and Administration

    • This course will cover how to build successful boards for responsible governance, community impact, and mission advancement; how to recruit, train, and manage staff and volunteers; how to develop resources and raise funds from institutional as well as individual contributors. It will also emphasize special ethical dimensions of nonprofit governance and administration
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7230 - Local Governance and City Management

    • This course will cover the common practices and problems of local government administrators and city managers, with special attention to the complex environment of and interrelations in the metropolitan and regional setting. It will explore the relationship between politics and administration and between city and county managers and their multiple constituencies.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7250 - Leadership and Ethics in Public Service

    • To increase the ability of individuals to deal with public and social problems in all areas of public service, this course concentrates on understanding and developing leadership roles and ethical practices. Emphasis will be on ethical leadership in the context of teamwork, participatory decision making and employee empowerment, and on the development of organizational cultures that promote individual initiative and leadership.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7390 - Public Financial Management

    • Public Financial Management is a sequel to the public budgeting course. Public finance is the study of where and how governments acquire resources. Taxes, fees, charges, debt concepts, and public finance theories are explored with an emphasis on actual government problem solving.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6350
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7430 - Regional and Local Planning

    • This course covers the theory, history and the technical and legal bases of regional/metropolitan and local planning. The topics to be discussed are the history of planning in the U.S. and European countries, the legal bases and politics of planning, the tools of land-use planning, community development, transportation planning, economic development and growth management, and environmental and energy planning. Particular emphases will be on the legal and technical aspects of planning in cities, counties, and metropolitan regions. The implications of citizen participation in planning for democracy and political processes will also be discussed.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7455 - Administrative Law

    • Administrative law provides students with a broad ranging analysis of how public administrators must handle constitutional and legal restraints placed on them by legislators, executives and the judiciary. The course provides an overview of those constraints then discusses in depth United States Supreme Court cases in which the law and constitution are applied to administrative actions.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7470 - Issues in Criminal Justice Administration

    • This course explores societal issues and trends which influence the administration of justice. These include liability issues; labor law applicability to a 24 hour/7 day a week operation; privatization; and diversity. It will address particular attention to the creation and impact of public policy.
    • Prerequisites: PAD 6200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7900 - Special Topics

    • Addresses topical issues in public or community services administration that are of special concern to students, faculty, and to the community.
    • Prerequisites: Consent of the program director. (Repeatable).
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7950 - Directed Study

    • Concentrated independent readings and investigations of special topics of interest to individual students. Readings, research, papers, and other projects will be determined jointly by the student and the instructor.
    • Prerequisites: Consent of the program director. (Repeatable.)
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7985 - Internship in Public Service

    • Culminating exercise required of all pre-service students; students must have permission of the graduate director prior to registering for this course or alternatively for PAD 7995. Students shall work for a minimum of 300 hours on site during the term (approximately 20 contact hours per week). Objectives for the internship, field placements, readings, and research topics will be determined jointly by the student and supervising faculty. Requires preparation of a final written paper that summarizes how internship objectives were met and culminates in an oral presentation that demonstrates how the candidate's internship has developed him/her as a public service professional. Emphasis will be placed on actual issues and problems faced by practicing administrations.
    • Prerequisites: Completion of 21 credit hours in the MPA program and approval of program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PAD 7995 - Public Service Practicum

    • Culminating exercise required of all in-service practitioners; students must have permission of the graduate director prior to registering for this course or alternatively for PAD 7985. With the guidance of the program director, the student will select a suitable topic and develop a proposal to guide completion of a fieldwork/ research project during the semester. Requires preparation of a written paper that summarizes the results of project and culminates in oral presentations that demonstrate how the candidate's work as a professional in public service will serve him/her and the community. Emphasis will be on actual issues and problems faced by practicing administrators.
    • Prerequisites: Completion of 21 credit hours in the MPA program and approval of program director.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Political Science & Int'l Affairs (POLS)

  • POLS 1101 - American Government in a Global Perspective

    • Examination of the institutions and processes of American government and Georgia State government. Global comparisons are made between the governments of the U.S. and other modern nation-states.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if required.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2212 - State and Local Government

    • A general survey of state and local government; recent and current trends.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2230 - Careers in International Affairs

    • This course focuses on academic and career planning and development issues for International Affairs majors.
    • Prerequisites: Declared International Affairs major
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2240 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

    • An introduction to the comparative approaches for the study of politics, focusing on patterns of development and change in contemporary political systems.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2250 - Introduction to International Relations

    • This course provides an introduction to the study of international relations. Sources of international order, conflict and war, determinants of foreign policy, global actors and the dynamics of political interaction between nation-states are examined.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2270 - Political Ideologies

    • Emphasizes the political development and application of contemporary ideologies such as nationalism, capitalism, socialism, democracy, marxism, conservatism, liberalism, feminism, communitarianism, facism, liberation movements, and others.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2280 - Research Methods

    • An introduction to the empirical methods in social science research. It provides the student with a working knowledge of the design, implementation and evaluation of social science research.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; MATH 0099 if required.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 2401 - Global Issues

    • Global Issues is an introductory survey course designed to introduce the students to numerous current issues confronting the globe’s policy-makers and populations. Specifically, the course provides an opportunity for diversity in the students’ educational program and provides information that fosters global understanding and engagement.
    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Learning Support English and Learning Support Mathematics requirements.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3300 - U.S. Constitution and Courts

    • POLS 3300 provides an overview of American law. The course covers the basic design and structures of the United States court system, trial and appellate legal process, and Constitutional law basics.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3313 - Public Policy Analysis

    • Introduction to public policy analysis using data and methodological approaches as well as political and social inputs into the policy process. Analysis of policy outcomes.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3315 - American Constitutional Law: Federalism

    • The constitutional powers and limitations of national legislative, executive and judicial branches are examined. The course includes analyses of the constitutional relationship of these political institutions to each other and to the states.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3320 - Legal Research

    • An introduction to legal resources for law-related courses and to problems that demonstrate the effective utilization of legal research and reference tools in a manner designed to meet the needs of the student in both law and non-law fields. An understanding of legal rules is necessary for scientists, archaeologists and other professionals.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3343 - Principles of Public Administration

    • The methods and procedures of governmental administration and the control of public bureaucracies in democratic societies.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3350 - American Foreign Policy

    • This course explores the conduct, substantive policy issues and problems associated with American foreign policy. The contemporary aspects and problems evolving out of and confronted by America's foreign policy are emphasized.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3356 - U.S. Environmental Policy & Politics

    • Explores U.S. environmental policy and politics from the implicit early efforts (conservationist and preservationist) to the explicit policy that emerged out of postwar environmental movements and culminated in the 1970 with the creation of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Emphasis is on the politics of making and implementing of environmental policy and on the effectiveness of environmental protection.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3360 - The United States Congress

    • Presents an in-depth treatment of the origins, development, operation of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3370 - The United States Presidency

    • Examines the historical development of the presidency, the constitutional powers, the personalities, the roles and the relationship with other governmental entities.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3380 - Mass Media and Politics

    • Examines the role of the mass media in society. Emphasis is placed on the media's role in the social, legal and political processes in the United States, as well as other democratic and nondemocratic countries.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3385 - Campaigns and Elections

    • An in-depth look at the process of selecting governmental leaders in the United States. Includes a segment on foreign elections.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3388 - Lobbying and Interest Groups

    • This course familiarizes students with public sector lobbying and the role of interest groups in a democratic society. The processes, procedures, and techniques of lobbying government entities will be examined in depth, as well as the issue concerns and persuasion strategies of interest groups. The course will focus on applied learning, and will help prepare students for employment in professional political environments.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3394 - Public Polling and Survey Techniques

    • This course introduces students to the techniques and uses of polls and surveys in political science and public policy. Students will learn the art of questionnaire design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, coding, and analysis. Students will learn the basics of telephone survey techniques and focus group moderation for the purposes of collecting information. Class projects may include the construction and implementation of a survey, reading and critiquing existing surveys and questionnaires. Quantitative and qualitative approaches will be examined.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 3396 - Cooperative Study

    • A supervised work experience program in business, industry or government. For sophomore, junior or senior level students who wish to obtain successive on-the-job experience in conjunction with their academic training.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; approval of Department Chair and Coordinator of Cooperative Education/Internship - Career Services.
    • Credits: 1-12 Credit Hours
  • POLS 3398 - Internship

    • A supervised, credit-earning work experience with a previously approved business firm, private agency or government agency. Students must make application with the Internship Coordinator before the end of the semester prior to the semester in which the internship is planned.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; approval of Department Chair and Department Internship Coordinator.
    • Credits: 1-12 Credit Hours
  • POLS 4000 - Practicum in Political Science and International Affairs

    • A pre-approved service and/or experiential activity that occurs domestically or internationally and links meaningful community service or cultural immersion with academic learning, personal growth, and civic or global responsibility. The activity may be part of a pre-existing volunteer program, NGO project, or international exchange or it may be individually designed with the instructor and approved by the chair. Students will be expected to keep a reflective journal and prepare a presentation that demonstrates learning objectives.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; 60 hours and permission of instructor and department chair/program director.
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours
  • POLS 4100 - Directed Applied Research

    • This course will offer students an opportunity to investigate political science-oriented concepts and issues by participating in faculty-supervised research or scholarship. Course content and instructional methodologies will be determined by the student and faculty member. The amount of work expected per student will be based on the number of assigned credit hours.
    • Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and department chair, and POLS 2280 or ACCT 2100 or ECON 2300.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4200 - Homeland Security Administration

    • This course examines the anatomy and response cycle of emergencies as they are managed by the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). A study of pertinent laws, executive orders, and preparedness and response activities at the national, state, and local levels enables each student to understand the nature of crisis management, appropriate responses, and the resulting impact on society.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4280 - Advanced Research Methods and Data Analysis

    • This course teaches students advanced techniques in political and social research methods. The course covers both qualitative and quantitative methods, including hands-on training in computer-based analysis of large datasets and social science statistical methods.
    • Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in POLS 2280.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4400 - Directed Study

    • Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; approval of Instructor, Advisor and Department Chair prior to registration.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • POLS 4402 - Political Parties

    • Examines the nature, structure and functions of political parties in differing national cultural contexts with particular attention to the electoral activity of political parties in the United States.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4405 - Comparative Legal Systems

    • An examination of the ways in which the courts and the law in different countries affect public policy. The source and methods utilized in different legal systems (both democratic and nondemocratic) as transforming agents of society and/or means for maintaining order within it are explored.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4410 - American Legal System

    • POLS 4410 is designed to be a capstone to the political science legal studies concentration. Potential topics include the structure and function of the U.S. legal system, as well as criminal justice and alternative dispute resolution, judicial behavior, and the connection between law and society.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4411 - Criminal Law

    • An examination of those areas in which the U.S. Constitution affects criminal justice. Emphasis on understanding the role of the Supreme Court of the United States in interpreting provisions of the Constitution that affect criminal justice. An attempt to understand the content of important decisions in this area as well as the reason given by the Court for decisions.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4412 - Urban Affairs and Problems

    • Emphasis on the changing patterns of local and municipal governments and politics, impact of reapportionment and other problems generated by an urbanized society.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4415 - Civil Liberties

    • An intensive study of the rights of Americans as guaranteed by the Constitution. The changing character of civil liberties problems in the United States will be stressed with attention given to the legal, historical and political context of the cases studied.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4416 - Law and Gender

    • POLS 4416 examines the relationship between law and gender in the United States, from the New Deal Era to the present day. Topics include how gender impacts the legal regulation of employment, education, reproduction, family life, and constitutional rights. Additionally, the course examines how women participate in the legal system as attorneys, judges, and mediators.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4420 - Judicial Process

    • Courts and judges as agents in the political system; focus is on the judicial decision-making process, with attention to psychological and other variables in that process. Relation of judicial process to legislative, administrative and electoral processes emphasized.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101 and POLS 3300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4423 - Great Political Thinkers

    • A survey of classical, medieval, and modern political thinkers and their political thoughts. It discusses their impacts on the development of political processes and institutions.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4427 - American Political Thought

    • This course explores the diverse spectrum of American political thinking from the pre-revolutionary period to the present. Beginning with colonial discourse, this comprehensive review captures the depth and distinctiveness of American thought as expressed by and through the writings and actions of philosophers, politicians, radicals, and revolutionaries.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4428 - Race, Gender, and the Politics of Difference

    • This course examines contemporary theories and politics of “difference,” broadly understood as institutionalized hierarchies which marginalize and oppress certain groups and inhibit their political power. Students use race, gender, sexuality, and class as intersecting analytical frameworks to understand how multiple hierarchies of difference are structured and reproduced in the political process. Using critical race, feminist, queer, and political theory, students explore how political dynamics are shaped by difference.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4429 - Legal Theory & Philosophy

    • This course examines different theories of jurisprudence and great thinkers of law. Students will learn about leal procedures, the stages of a trial, the appeals process. Students will also analyze core legal concepts such as habeas corpus, judicial power, judicial review, originalism, stare decisis, positivism, consequentialism, strict construction, judicial activism, judicial nominalism, and judicial restraint.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4430 - International Law and Organization

    • This course examines the system of law governing relations between nation-states, and the roles and functions of international organizations. It explores the conventional international law in the areas of diplomacy, territorial questions and armed conflicts, as well as the developing regimes in trade and human rights. In addition, the course examines the structures and functions of some contemporary organizations in the security and economic areas and evaluates their performance and contribution.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4431 - Politics of International Terrorism

    • A study of the history and tactics of modern terrorism as well as efforts by modern government to counteract them.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4433 - European Union Politics

    • This course explores the politics and policy- making processes of the European Union (EU). It is divided into three parts. The first part addresses the history of European integration and the major theories utilized to explain its origins, evolution and operation. The second part of the course examines the structures and processes that constitute the machinery of EU policy-making. The third part of the course examines the politics of policy-making in an array of issue areas, including the single market, the Euro, & external trade policy. We also examine various non-economic policy areas such as foreign and security policy.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4436 - Politics of Developing Areas

    • This course confronts the patterns of development of governmental institutions and use of political processes in meeting the problems of the emerging nations of Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2240 or POLS 2250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4437 - Global Security

    • This course explores the primary threats to international security in the 21st century and examines the response of national governments, the United Nations, and regional international organizations in meeting the challenges posed by those threats.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4438 - International Political Economy

    • An exploration of the fundamental questions about government and policies, about market systems and about relations between the two.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2250 and ECON 2200
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4439 - Political Economy of Transition in Russia and Central Asia

    • This course examines the political and economic processes of reform in a variety of post-communist societies, including Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Mongolia. A significant portion of the course involves a discussion of the impediments to development in either domain, as well as the significant barriers to economic competition in the world marketplace.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4444 - Administrative Practices and Organization

    • Problems of personnel, finance, administrative law, and the growth and significance of administrative legislation and adjudication.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4446 - Governmental Budgeting

    • This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the role of budgeting in the governmental process. Budgetary actors, their motivations, their stakes and their behaviors are investigated. Students examine the legislative process of the budget and budgetary implementation. Students are introduced to cutback management, funding mandates and other current issues in governmental budgeting.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4448 - Politics of Eurasia

    • This course examines the unique political traditions and governing institutions of Eurasia by examining the pre-communist, communist, and post-communist periods. In so doing, it compares and contrasts the Russian-dominated Eurasian experience with that of it European and East Asian neighbors.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4449 - Russian Foreign Policy

    • This course examines the international relations of Eurasian states, with particular reference to the Russian Federation’s position in the global security, political, and economic realms, past and present. It covers both intra-Eurasian relations, as well as Russia’s relations with the outside world. The course focuses upon major foreign policy issues that resonate within the region and beyond.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2250
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4452 - Politics of the Pacific Rim

    • The course is designed to acquaint students with political institutions and processes of China, Japan and Korea. Particular emphasis will be placed on analysis of the relations of these countries with the United States on selected issues of contemporary relevance.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4453 - Latin America: Democracy and Development

    • Examines contemporary socio-political and economic characteristics as well as political institutions needed to understand the countries of Latin America. Two important themes' (democracy building and development) will form the central focus of this course. Driving forces which facilitate and/or hinder the Latin American quest for political stability and economic development will also be examined. These include political parties, labor and peasant movements, economic elites, religious organizations and the military. The role and influence of the United States on Latin American politics will also be examined.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4454 - Politics of the Middle East

    • This course examines contemporary sociopolitical and economic characteristics needed to understand the many countries of the Middle East/North Africa. The role of Islam, the Gulf war, the quest for development, the Palestine issue, and democracy versus authoritarianism are themes which will be covered in the course. In addition, a 'country profile' approach will also be used. This course examines key countries and studies their political structures in detail.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4455 - International Relations of Africa

    • This course examines the international relations of African states within a conceptual context, with particular reference to Africa’s position in the global political economy. It covers both intra-African relations and African relations with the outside world. The main purpose is an attempt to understand African external politics in order to deal with them, by analyzing past practices and projecting new trends.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4456 - International Environmental Policy

    • An examination of the basic elements of environmental policy making in the international arena. The course highlights current issues such as tropical rain forests, the 'Global Commons' concept, bio-diversity and endangered species. Policy approaches will draw upon examples from specific countries as well as policy developed within international organizations such as the United Nations.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4457 - South Asian Politics: A Comparative Perspective

    • This course is an overview of the main issues that overlay politics in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. It covers the common historical background and the development of political institutions across the region. The course highlights the main cleavages along which politics are organized and related political, social, and economic outcomes, including the political party system, economic development, social movements, and ethnic conflict.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 2240.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4466 - Trial Procedure and Evidence

    • POLS 4466 enhances students' knowledge of the adversary process. Students learn and apply the basics of trial procedure and evidence through an in-depth trial simulation. Students who complete this course are eligible to compete on KSU's intercollegiate mock trial team.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4470 - Alternative Dispute Resolution

    • A survey of the theory and methods of alternative dispute resolution and conflict management, with simulation in facilitation, mediation and negotiation. Basic skills will be taught.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4480 - Practicum in Alternative Dispute Resolution

    • A capstone course designed to meet the Alternative Dispute Resolution Certificate Program by integrating the students' prior training in alternative dispute resolution in on-site applied settings and in on-campus seminars. Students will be given applied experiences in selected public or private organizations in the community or in campus-related programs to make use of their ADR training.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 4470; permission of Program Coordinator.
    • Credits: 2-2-3
  • POLS 4490 - Special Topics in Political Science

    • Selected special topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101; approval of Instructor and Department Chair.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 4499 - Senior Seminar

    • This capstone course is designed to complete the major by integrating the problems, research and theories from the divergent specialty areas of the Political Science curriculum. The course will focus on both the theoretical and empirical concerns, as well as the interconnectedness among the various Political Science specialty areas.
    • Prerequisites: POLS 1101, and the completion of at least 18 hours of the upper division major requirements for the political science major, or at least 15 hours of the upper division major requirements for the international affairs major.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • POLS 7705 - Political Ideologies

    • A description and assessment of the most common ideologies facing the world and their economic, social and political consequences. Emphasis will be placed on capitalism, socialism, fascism, democracy and totalitarianism.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study in education.
    • Credits: 3-0-3